Shine a Light on Human Trafficking

photo courtesy of: http://www.houstonrr.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/ShineALight-KS-300x394.jpg

Many people believe that slavery ended in 1863 when President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation.  While this is of course true and helped to close the door on a dark period in American history, slavery is in fact still a harsh reality in today’s world.  Regarded as a form of modern day slavery, human trafficking, the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring or receipt of individuals for the purpose of exploitation, is the fastest growing and most profitable area of organized crime in the world.  With approximately 20.9 million victims, human trafficking impacts children and adults alike in cities, countries, and continents all around the world.

photo courtesy of: http://www.houstonrr.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/ShineALight-KS-300x394.jpg

photo courtesy of: http://www.houstonrr.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/ShineALight-KS-300×394.jpg

The severity and continued growth of the human trafficking industry caught the attention of Congress and in 2000 they passed the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA), which declared all types of human trafficking a federal crime.  The TVPA wasn’t enacted for only prosecutorial reasons, but is also aimed at prevention through public awareness programs.  In 2003, 2005, 2008, and 2011, increasing knowledge and awareness of the issue led to developments in the act and in 2013, President Obama signed the reauthorization of the TVPA, recognizing the magnitude of the international human trafficking problem and reestablishing the important role the TVPA plays in combating it.

While the U.S. government has taken a stance against the human trafficking problem through legislation, campaigns for public awareness and educating citizens on reporting tips can urge individuals to take a stance as well. One such initiative is underway in the city of Houston, one of the principal supply and transport sites for children and adult trafficking victims due to its proximity, demographics, substantial immigrant labor force, and easy access to I-10, the number one route for human trafficking in the United States.  During the month of September, Houston’s Human Trafficking Awareness Month, Mayor Annise Parker vows to provide the pubic with informative facts about the global dilemma as well as educate individuals about ways they can help combat the problem.  Houston’s public awareness campaign, “Shine a Light on Human Trafficking,” is aimed at educating the public on how to recognize signs of human trafficking and encouraging them to report suspicious situations to the appropriate authorities.  Other states, such as Ohio, have recently pledged resources and manpower to establish public awareness campaigns in order to educate the public on the problem of human trafficking.

Long-term education and awareness campaigns like “Shine a Light on Human Trafficking” can play a big role in combating modern day slavery.  With numerous businesses such as massage parlors, escort services, salons, and modeling agencies acting as fronts for the human trafficking industry, increased awareness of the warning signs and recognition of the types of establishments that have been known to be involved in the industry can help authorities put an end to this epidemic.  Often hidden in plain sight, law enforcement agencies often rely on the public for tips to locate, dismantle, and prosecute individuals involved in these organizations.

Modern human trafficking presents the most widespread global slave trade known to mankind, with more people enslaved today than at any other time in human history. A violation of one of the most basic human rights, efforts to combat this epidemic should be tailored towards the restoration of that fundamental human right—freedom.  It is a common misconception that human trafficking presents only a vast international problem; the U.S. State Department estimates that between 600,000 and 800,000 individuals are purchased and sold across international lines and borders every year, the United States included.  Making people more aware of this fact alone can help combat the human trafficking dilemma.  Awareness campaigns are invented to provide the tools needed to help bring the victims to safety and individuals involved in the human trafficking industry to justice.

For those who live in Houston and would like to take part in “Shine a Light on Human Trafficking,” the campaign will kick off at City Hall on September 24 at 6:30 p.m.

First Court of Appeals Decision on Certification of Juvenile Offenders

On July 30, 2013, the First Court of Appeals in Houston reversed Cameron Moon’s 2010 murder conviction and 30 year sentence. The Appellate Court found that the juvenile court abused its discretion in waiving jurisdiction and certifying Moon for trial as an adult. Moon was 16 when he was arrested for his crime.

The juvenile court transferred Moon based on findings relating to Moon’s maturity, sophistication, and potential rehabilitation. However, upon review, the Appellate Court found insufficient evidence to support these findings. Despite Moon’s juvenile probation officer, forensic psychiatrist, therapist, and even his ex-girlfriend’s mother all testifying to his amenability to treatment and “likelihood of reasonable rehabilitation,” the juvenile court transferred Moon “due to the seriousness of the crime alone.”

The Appellate Court pointedly stated that “a finding based on the seriousness of the offense [or the background of the juvenile]…does not absolve the juvenile court of its duty to consider the [juvenile’s sophistication, maturity, and the likelihood of rehabilitation].” The Court notes that if the nature of the offense alone could justify waiver of jurisdiction, juveniles committing certain “serious” crimes would be automatically transferred to adult court, and the other factors “would be rendered superfluous.” The Court further admonishes the juvenile court’s finding as “manifestly unjust,” and refers to another case stating there is nothing in the statute “which suggests that a child may be deprived of the benefits of our juvenile court system merely, because the crime with which he is charged is a ‘serious’ crime.”

The Moon judgment is a significant win for juvenile justice advocates, because it criticizes and trumps previous cases stating that the trial court need only find the seriousness of the offense or background of the juvenile to determine whether certification and transfer is proper. There is now a clear directive to the juvenile courts to consider and prove all the statutory factors when determining child certifications.

Moon’s case remains pending in the juvenile court. You can read the appellate court opinion here.

Photo source: http://www.pgal.com/media/portfolio/NBaker_Courthouse_110908_3451.jpg

Forum on New Healthcare Law’s Health Insurance Marketplace & How to Prepare

Healthcare In a Changing Landscape: Connecting Houstonians to Coverage: A Citywide Forum for Stakeholders and Consumers

View the Forum Agenda & Register Online @ www.cdftexas.org/houstonforum

Children's Defense Fund: HealthCare in a Changing Landscape

  • COSPONSORS: Children’s Defense Fund, Texas Organizing Project & Enroll America’s Get Covered America campaign.
  • WHERE: Krost Hall, University of Houston Law Center
  • WHEN: Saturday, September 7, 2013, 9 AM – 4 PM
  • WHAT: Children’s Defense Fund-Texas, Texas Organizing Project, the Center for Children, Law & Policy, and Enroll America’s Get Covered America campaign will present a citywide forum for stakeholders and consumers all about upcoming opportunities to enroll in affordable healthcare coverage through the new Health Insurance Marketplace. Beginning October 1, the Health Insurance Marketplace (part of the Affordable Care Act) will finally open for business. For the first time, 3 million Texans – children and families – will have affordable healthcare options. A new day for healthcare in America is around the corner and we invite you to join the conversation.
  • AGENDA: Full agenda available here.
  • REGISTER at www.cdftexas.org/houstonforum.