Saturday Children and the Law News Roundup


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Massachusetts Fails to Ensure the Safe Administration of Psychotropic Medications to Children in Foster Care, Children’s Rights

The Massachusetts Department of Children and Families (DCF) lacks an oversight system and qualified staff to ensure that foster children are safely and appropriately administered psychiatric prescriptions, according to an expert report released today by attorneys for Children’s Rights, who represent foster children in a lawsuit against the state.

Ed in the election: Obama and Romney spar over education spending in first presidential debate, HechingerEd Blog (Hechinger Report)

In the first presidential debate Wednesday night, President Obama and Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney immediately dove into an often neglected topic on the campaign trail: education.

The issue came up early and often, starting when both candidates mentioned education in their opening statements. Obama called for increased investment in public schools; Romney said the U.S. needs to have “the best schools in the world.”

Obama repeatedly hammered on the idea that he has supported education spending, while charging that Romney would reduce resources for schools in a quest to reduce the deficit. To emphasize his point, Obama told the story of a Las Vegas teacher who had 42 students in her classroom for the first two weeks of school and 10-year-old textbooks to teach them with.

Feds Receive Record Number of Complaints About Special Education, On Special Education – Education Week

A new report from the U.S. Department of Education’s office for civil rights says that, from 2009 to 2011, the agency received more complaints about disability issues than ever before in a three-year period.

During that time, 55 percent of the total number of complaints the civil rights office received had to do with disabilities. To put that number in context, consider that OCR enforces civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination in a host of other areas, including race, national origin, sex, and age.

The report out this month also drills down to what specific areas within disability rights were inquired about most often.

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