Officers on School Campuses Negative Impacts


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The ability to teach a child something carries excellent weight on how they gain knowledge to understand the lessons learned in that taught experience. “Reducing recidivism should be the goal of public safety, not more punishment,” as stated by Alycia Castillo, aligns with the lessons youth are taught. Black children are punished at a much higher rate than their white counterparts for crimes. The punishments served are more severe, as “[c]hildren of color, particularly Black children, are overrepresented in arrests and other police contact.” As these Black children are taught that being arrested is the result of punishment, they then accept arrest as a punishment. Many of these cases do not deserve punishment, but it does not need to be as severe as an arrest if needed. There should be better ways of rehabilitating all but predominantly Black and Brown children rather than punishing them severely for their unfortunate run-ins with the law.

The punishment issues can arise with the presence of police on school campuses. “Arrests increase the likelihood that students will drop out of school.” This is a byproduct of punishment that Black and Brown children face from police in schools. Many students may give up on their studies if facing run-ins with the law is part of it. Some may see that no matter if their inside or outside the school, they will still be a run-in with the law. This unfortunate event is an occurrence that happens too often in Black and Brown communities. “When youth come into contact with police, including through arrests, they miss classroom learning time, are stigmatized by peers and teachers, and may experience trauma related to the physical and psychological humiliations of arrest.” This is a negative impact on Black and Brown children, especially in Harris County as “[i]n 2020, in Harris County just for example, Black kids were 19 times more likely to be confined than white kids, and Latino kids were about seven times more likely to be confined than their white peers,” stated by Castillo. There is a substantially higher population of white children to Black children in Harris County, yet many children being confined as punishment are Black children.

The unfair practice of punishment is one of many practices done to marginalized communities. To have police on school campuses increases the chances that Black and Brown children experience these unfair punishments. Additionally, the resources used on policing in schools affect Black and Brown children more negatively than white children. These resources should be reallocated to resolve run-ins with the law as a rehabilitation effort. The unfair treatment of Black and Brown people with the law outside of school is already extreme, and we shouldn’t allow the treatment of Black in Brown children in school to be the same.

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