Weekly Round Up (November 7, 2019)

A new Trump administration rule could hurt LGBTQ youth in foster care

Foster care agencies could soon turn away prospective foster parents because they are gay or trans, thanks to a rule proposed by the Trump administration on Friday.

The rule would remove language protecting LGBTQ people and others from discrimination in programs funded by grants from the Department of Health and Human Services, according to the Washington Post.

The change would apply to a wide range of programs, including those aimed at HIV prevention and treatment for opioid addiction and other substance abuse. But advocates say it appears targeted at the child welfare system, where it could have devastating effects, including keeping children from finding homes and even funneling them into the prison system.

Read more here . . . 

 

Genesis, 9, draws her family in Matamoros, while her tía watches them from Brownsville, Texas.  I want to leave from here because I can't be happy and I can't sleep,  she writes. She believes there are crocodiles in the Rio Grande river, where many asylum-seekers bathe and wash their clothes.‘They’re Screaming for Help.’ See Drawings From Children Stuck in Mexico as They Seek U.S. Asylum

“America, where they didn’t let me in,” writes 11-year-old Jose from Honduras in Spanish next to a picture of mountains and trees on a canvas in blue, green and brown colors. He also drew a river — the Rio Grande that separates him from Brownsville, Texas, where his family hopes to claim asylum. “La tierra prometida,” he writes. “The promised land.”

Jose is one of at least 1,450 migrants who are living in a tent encampment on the streets of Matamoros, a city in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas, as a result of the Trump Administration’s “Remain in Mexico” policy. Dozens of children in Matamoros drew their experiences as part of an art project, photos of which were provided exclusively to TIME by Dr. Belinda Arriaga, an associate professor at the University of San Francisco who specializes in child trauma and Latino mental health. She traveled to Matamoros Oct. 19-25 as part of a group of volunteers who provided aid and psychological care to migrant children and their families.

Read more here . . . 

 

No More ‘At-Risk’ Students in California

A decades-long effort to change how educators talk about students facing economic or social challenges has been backed by California lawmakers.

bill to remove references to “at-risk youth” and replace the term with “at-promise youth” in California’s Education Code and Penal Code was approved by California governor Gavin Newsom in mid-October. The California Education Code is a collection of laws primarily applying to public K-12 schools. The bill does not change the definition of “at risk,” it merely replaces it with “at promise.”

 “For far too long, the stigmatizing label of ‘at risk’ has been used to describe youth living in difficult situations,” said Assembly member Reginald Byron Jones-Sawyer Sr., lead author of the bill, in an address to the California State Assembly earlier this year.

Weekly Roundup (September 26, 2019)

Grown-up solutions to combat child poverty

Some communities refuse to just sit back and watch tens of thousands of children grow up in poverty — a circumstance that makes them more likely to face diminished educational and job prospects, violence, incarceration and a host of health problems that shorten life expectancy by a decade.

In southwestern Pennsylvania, numerous nonprofit organizations, foundations, government agencies, schools, businesses and individuals are working to combat the effects — and in some cases the causes — of child poverty. But:

  • We have no unified plan, goal or leadership on the issue.
  • There is no single place to go to find out who is doing what to address the problem.
  • Many measures with track records for getting kids out of poverty, or reducing its bite, have not yet been tried here.

Read more . . . 

 

Juvenile arrests in Oklahoma decline

A group of local youth gathered inside a community center Tuesday night in south Oklahoma City, where Oklahoma City police Staff Sgt. Tony Escobar and other adult mentors led them in a discussion about leadership.

Earlier in the night, Escobar dished out slices of pizza. Now, he helped the students as they split into small groups, tasked with identifying positive traits and weaknesses of famous leaders.

At the end of the exercise, Taylor Wood, volunteer coordinator, challenged the students to decide what kind of leader they want to be.

“Everything that you do, you can be a leader,” she told them. “You don’t have to be a leader that the whole world knows about. You don’t even have to get credit for being a leader, but you can be a leader in every situation. At home, among your friends, at school, if you play sports. No matter what you do, you have an opportunity to be a leader.”  Read more . . .

 

Suzann Stewart: Family Safety Center is moving the needle on intimate partner violence, sexual assault and accountability

I keep a top 10 list on my computer at the Family Safety Center. It’s not the top 10 in good things … but the bad things like access to health care, high incidences of adverse childhood experiences scores in children and adults, intimate partner and family violence, education rates, high incarceration rates etc.

Seems morbid, but it’s motivational for me with the staff and agency partners who perform above and beyond daily in our work to improve the lives and health of our most vulnerable family members and friends. It reminds me that every day our partnership is making a huge difference in changing the bad effects of those statistics for the better.

Tulsa does have a top 10 nationally recognized change agent in this partnership model of co-located multidisciplinary agencies, with three trend-changing programs moving the needle: to mitigate and eradicate family and intimate partner violence, identify and more effectively treat victims of multiple traumas and hold offenders accountable for their abuse.  Read more . . . 

Weekly Roundup

Long road to rehabilitation: Maharashtra juvenile justice system cuts pendency, but challenges remain, Firstpost

Maharashtra has reduced the pendency of cases before its juvenile justice boards (JJBs) by one-third in the past few years, but a lot remains to be done in the system when it comes to rehabilitation[.]

The National Conference on Juvenile Justice Promotes Solutions to Ensure Effective Juvenile Justice Systems Across the Country, Nevada Business

More than 400 of the top leaders, judges and court professionals of juvenile justice reform gathered in Las Vegas, Nev. on March 21-23 for the National Conference on Juvenile Justice hosted by the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ).

Probing The Complexities Of Transgender Mental Health, NPR

[A] study published this month . . . looked at the mental health of 73 transgender children between ages 3 and 12. [The] group [of children] did not experience any more depression, and had only slightly more anxiety, than their siblings and nontransgender peers.

Why are our kids so miserable?, Quartz

“Something in modern life is undermining mental health[.]” . . . Specifically, something is undermining young people’s mental health, especially girls.

More Sophisticated Transition Planning Needed for Foster Youth with Complex Needs, The Chronicle of Social Change

Youth who age out of foster care face obstacles like homelessness, unemployment and poverty.

Think about how much harder it is for young people with complex needs like a chronic illness or an intellectual disability. Youth with complex needs require extra support when they exit the foster care system at age 18 or 21, depending on the state, but there is too often little or no support.

The Untold Stories Of Black Girls, NPR

Recent research has documented that black girls are punished at school at rates that are even more disproportionate than those experienced by black boys.

The ‘Silent Epidemic’ of Child Trauma, The Chronicle of Social Change

Last week [Pia Escudero, director of the School Mental Health Unit at the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD)], presented on her work with FOCUS at Echo Parenting and Education’s conference on creating trauma-informed schools. 

Exercise May Help Young People With Severe Mental Health Disorders, Huffington Post

 For young adults who have experienced severe mental health disorders, exercise may help reduce the severity of their symptoms, a new, small study suggests.

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