Weekly Roundup

Rampant Human Rights Violations of Children Internationally

On October 31, 2017, the United Security Council met to discuss their deep concern for international abuse of children. The Council said that it is “gravely concerned by the scale and severity” of human rights abuses and violations of international humanitarian law committed against children in some countries, including terrorism, mass abductions, and sexual slavery, which can cause displacement and affect access to education and healthcare services. You can read more about the Council meeting here. Attached was a report that chronicles the high number of child casualties in Afghanistan. Additionally, 50 children have already been killed in Jamaica this calendar year and you can read more about that here. These human rights violations don’t just stop with homicide, as lack of access to education is another disheartening disparity. You can read about the President of Tanzania banning pregnant girls from school here.

Surrogate Mother wins Custody Battle for Biological Son

In Perris, California, surrogate Jessica Allen gave birth to two healthy children she believed to be twins. It turned out that one of those babies was actually her biological child. This happened as a result of what is called superfetation, and it occurs when a woman continues to ovulate after becoming pregnant, resulting in two babies with different gestational ages and, in this case, two different sets of genetic parents. This only happens in 1 in several million pregnancies. Allen reported that after a complicated process, she and her husband Wardell Jasper got custody of their son in February. You can read more about this medical marvel and custody battle here.

States in the U.S. Seek to End Child Marriage

Though many U.S. officials are critical of child marriage abroad, we are guilty of allowing the exact same practice right in our own backyard. In 25 states in the United States there are no minimum age requirements to wed, while in the others, the age requirement ranges from 13-17 years old. Child marriage correlates with domestic violence, psychiatric disorders, dropping out of high-school, poverty and financial instability, and early stress that leads to heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. That is exactly why Human Rights Watch has launched a campaign to support a bill that could potentially end child marriage in Florida. As it stands now, pregnant girls in Florida can get married at any age if a judge approves it. You can learn more about child marriage in the U.S. here.

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