Weekly Roundup

Rapper Common Lobbies for Juvenile Justice

On Monday, August 21st, Common and other artists threw a concert to raise funds and awareness for juvenile justice reform in California.  “I believe it is my duty to lend my voice to the voiceless and stand with the men and women in prison who have been silenced for so long,” Common said in a statement. “We need a justice system that is a tool for rehabilitation rather than a weapon for punishment.” They hope to shed a light on bail reform initiatives, among others. You can read more about the concert here and here.

Logic’s Song 1-800-273-8255 Brings Awareness to Suicide Prevention

Another rapper is using their art form to help children and adults struggling with depression. Logic partnered with Alessia Cara and Khalid on the track titled “1-800-273-8255”, which just so happens to be the National Suicide Prevention Hotline’s number. The song discusses how difficult it can be to feel alone and discounted, suicidal even, but its main message is hope. Not only did the call center receive the 2nd most calls it ever has the day following the release, but calls are up 33%. This song not only brings hope to those struggling, but awareness to potential allies. Read more about it here and watch the emotional 7-minute music video here.

Congress Faces Child Healthcare Deadline

Federal funding for 9 million low- and middle-income children is set to expire at the end of September, setting up a crucial deadline for a Congress. The looming deadline for the Children’s Health Insurance Program has been overshadowed by the GOP effort to repeal ObamaCare, and lawmakers left D.C. for the summer without addressing the issue. The stakes are high, and the uncertainty has states worried. The longer Congress waits to renew the program, the more likely it will be that they have to impose enrollment slowdowns or even cancel policies. You can read more about what is at stake for kids here.

Molly Bagshaw

About Molly Bagshaw

Molly is a second-year law student at the University of Houston Law Center. Molly graduated from Princeton University in 2013 with a degree in sociology, African American studies, and spanish. Molly then served as a Teach for America corps member for two years in a Title One school in Fort Worth, Texas and spent the next year working for the San Francisco Public Defender's Office. Molly has worked for numerous lawyers and public defenders, and is committed to a career in indigent defense. She is excited to be spending this summer working at the Juvenile Public Defender in Travis County to pursue this goal in an environment that encompasses everything she is passionate about.

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