Weekly Roundup

Minority juvenile offenders face inequities in mental health treatment, The Dallas Morning News

Every day, our jails and prisons take in large numbers of offenders who have serious mental health issues. But how good are we in diagnosing and treating their illnesses? Traditionally, not very good, and the record gets worse with respect to providing the most appropriate treatment. And as a recent study that I was part of published in the Journal of Youth & Adolescence showed, it is even more distressing when we examined diagnosis and treatment among racial/ethnic groups. Read more.

Youth advocates alarmed by proposed pharmacy robbery bill, Indianapolis Reporter

A proposed amendment that would automatically move certain juvenile robbery suspects to adult court is raising alarm among youth advocates.

Senate Bill 170, written by Republican State Sen. Michael Young, who represents District 35, would amend the so-called “direct file statute” to include pharmacy robbery among the list of juvenile offenses sent directly to adult court. That list currently includes attempted murder, murder, rape and other crimes. In the law’s current iteration, robbery is only included in the statute if it involves a deadly weapon or bodily injury. Read more.

Obama’s Legacy on Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice, Social Justice Solutions

President Barack Obama exits stage right on Friday after presiding over one of the most interesting periods in American history. He leaves with a high approval rating, yet transfers power to a man who vows to undo much of the work done by his administration.

Child welfare and juvenile justice were decidedly not front and center for this administration, or any of the administrations that came before it. But Obama will leave office with a legacy of action in both realms. Read more.

Being incarcerated as a juvenile tied to poor health years later, Reuters

People incarcerated as juveniles may have worse physical and mental health as adults than youths who did not spend time in detention centers or correctional facilities, according to a new study. Read more.

www.forcesociety.com

www.forcesociety.com

Rocío Rodríguez Ruiz

About Rocío Rodríguez Ruiz

Rocío Rodríguez Ruiz is a second year student at the University of Houston Law Center (UHLC). Rocío received her B.A. from Agnes Scott College. Before entering law school, she taught middle school history at D.M. Sauceda in Donna, Texas with Teach For America. After completing her corps service, she taught at KIPP Voyage Academy for Girls, where she designed the curriculum for her non-fiction studies class. Rocío then taught mathematics for two additional years at HISD’s Jane Long Academy. She interned at the federal courthouse this past summer. At UHLC, Rocío is involved with the Hispanic Law Students Association and the Houston Law Review, and serves as a mentor for the Pre-Law Pipeline Program.

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