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  • FREE WEBINAR

How to Reform Youth Justice and Defense Work With Byrne Grants
Free webinar hosted by National Juvenile Defender Center and National Juvenile Justice Network.
Thursday November 17,  2 pm – 3pm EST / 11 am – 12 pm PST.  You can register for the webinar by visiting: http://www.njjn.org/article/byrne-grants-webinar  

“Byrne Justice Assistance Grants (JAG) funnel millions of federal dollars to states, localities, and non-profits, but have been underused for juvenile justice reform and indigent defense. Historically, this funding has been primarily allocated to law enforcement. But indigent defense is now a priority area for JAG funding. In addition, the federal Bureau of Justice Assistance recently changed the way it evaluates how the JAG funds are used. Their revised accountability measures focus more on reducing crime and incarceration, making it a favorable time to seek this funding for youth justice reform and defense work. Learn more about these grants and strategies for accessing them.”

“So far, the only relatively detailed Trump K-12 policy proposal that may make its way to Congress is a $20 billion school choice program that would pay for disadvantaged students to attend private, charter, magnet, and traditional public schools of their choice. But in 2015, during negotiations over what became ESSA, lawmakers rejected a very similar idea to make federal funds for those students “portable” to both public and private schools. So it’s not clear that Congress will put serious energy behind that proposal, if Trump advances it.

Members of Congress may also have to consider a push by Trump to eliminate the Education Department altogether. During the campaign, Trump had pledged to drastically cut or eliminate the U.S. Department of Education during his presidency.” read more.

 

“LOS ANGELES — Nearly all of the 120,000 or so undocumented children in California who were previously enrolled in restricted Medi-Cal (California’s name for Medicaid, the insurance program for low-income people) are now enrolled in full-scope Medi-Cal, giving them access to a wide range of services, including dental and mental health care.

Now, six months after expanded Medi-Cal for all children launched, health care advocates are trying to reach the deportation-wary parents of an estimated 80,000 to 100,000 undocumented minors who have yet to enroll.

“Your children are eligible for dental care,” said panelist Maritza C. Cabezas, dental director at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. “Dental disease is 100 percent preventable.”

Cabezas, one of five panelists at the Nov. 3 New America Media ethnic media briefing, co-hosted by Maternal and Child Access (MCHA), said that dental care needs are great in Los Angeles County, which has a large low-income immigrant population” read more.

Camille Van Kote

About Camille Van Kote

Camille Van Kote is a third year student at the University of Houston Law Center. She graduated from Barnard College in 2012. As an undergraduate, she worked as an AmeriCorps member for Jumpstart for Young Children. She was also involved with the Columbia Child Rights Group, where she spearheaded various campus-wide events, including film screenings, conferences and fundraisers, to promote awareness on children’s issues. She interned at Tahirih Justice Center and Kids in Need of Defense, working with courageous women and unaccompanied minors fleeing violence. This past summer, she interned at the Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights, an NGO advocating for sexual and reproductive rights as human rights.

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