Wednesday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

‘Boy or Girl?’ Gender a New Challenge for Schools, Fox News

From the time they are born, we put our boys in blue beanies and our girls in pink ones. It’s a societal norm, an expectation even, that you just are what you are born – a boy or a girl.

From early on, we divide toys and activities by very distinct gender lines, with superheroes and trucks and muck on one side and princesses and dolls and all things frilly on the other.

Many children land, enthusiastically, on the expected side. Others dabble in both “girl” and “boy” things. But what if your kid, even from an early age, mostly showed interest in doing opposite-gender things? More importantly, what if they wanted to be the opposite gender – or a less-defined mix of both? And what if they wanted to test those limits in public places, like school?

Report: Nation’s Kids Need to Get More Physical, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Reading, writing, arithmetic — and PE?

The prestigious Institute of Medicine is recommending that schools provide opportunities for at least 60 minutes of physical activityeach day for students and that PE become a core subject.

Bipolar Disorder Tied to Mother’s Flu in Pregnancy, Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Children born after being exposed to the flu during pregnancy may have a nearly four-fold higher risk of later developing bipolar disorder, according to a small new study.

The senior researcher said the results can’t prove that a mother’s bout of flu while pregnant causes her child to develop the mental disorder, but the association does suggest that some cases might be prevented.

Amendments to Juvenile Justice Law Near Approval, Inquirer News

Authorities may soon keep repeat or serious offenders aged 12 to 15 years old off the streets and in the custody of social workers, according to draft amendments to the law on juvenile delinquents, which are up for approval by both chambers of Congress next week.

 

Megan Mikutis

About Megan Mikutis

Megan Mikutis is a second year student at the University of Houston Law Center. She graduated from the University of Houston – Clear Lake in 2012 with a B.A. in Literature. While obtaining her undergraduate degree, Megan tutored undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students in writing while working for the University of Houston – Clear Lake Writing Center. This summer, Megan worked for the Center for Children, Law, and Policy and had the opportunity to compose a policy statement discussing the disproportionate representation of Limited English Proficient students in special education. Currently, Megan serves as the President of the Student Bar Association as well as a member of the Hispanic Law Student Association. Megan is most interested in education and special education issues.

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