Tuesday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Newtown Parents Learn Comforting Details About Son’s Death, CNN

His parents remember Dylan Hockley as such a happy child.

He was 6 and full of joy, his mother, Nicole Hockley, says.

She said he was always smiling and described his laugh as infectious. When his dad would return to their Newtown, Connecticut, home each day, Dylan would run to his father, Ian, saying,”Daddy!”

It’s been exactly a month since Dylan and his teacher, Anne Marie Murphy, and 24 other students and adults were killed by a lone gunman at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

As would be expected, coping has been hard.

“It’s a strange moment when you wake up in the morning and for that brief second everything is as it was,” she says. “And then you realize that nothing is ever as it was — and never will be again.”

Judge:  Kids Must Wear Locator Chips in Texas School, HLN

A U.S. District judge ruled this week that a Texas school can put locator chips on its students — and expel those who don’t comply.

In the controversial ruling, District Judge Orlando Garcia said San Antonio Northside School District was within its rights to kick sophomore Andrea Hernandez out of Jay High School. The 15-year-old refused to wear the device, which has become mandatory since last fall for all students while on school property.

HLN wrote about the school district’s plans last summer, along with the blogosphere’s reaction to it, in which many viewed the new ID badges embedded with radio frequency identification (RFID) chips as an affront to privacy. School officials said the devices would help to keep tabs on troublesome students and help identify which students were cutting class and so on. There is also a financial incentive to use the devices: School revenue is reportedly determined in part by attendance rolls – something the ID badges are designed to track.

Boy, 12, Guilty of Murder in Death of Neo-Nazi Dad, NBC News

A 12-year-old was found responsible for the second-degree murder of his father, a regional director of a neo-Nazi organization, a judge ruled Monday.

The “responsible” verdict is the juvenile court equivalent of guilty.

Riverside Superior Court Judge Jean Leonard acknowledged the boy’s “long history of abuse and neglect.” The case was heard without a jury.

Leonard agreed with a psychologist who testified during trial that for the boy, “the potential for violence could have been predicted” based on prenatal substance abuse by the mother, domestic violence between parents and the father’s neo-Nazi philosophy.

Teachers Among 50 Arrested in Child Sex Sting, CNN

They came from all over, police say, and at least one carried condoms in his pocket.

A middle school teacher, a tourist visiting from Turkey, college students, a businessman from North Carolina. All of them were arrested in a week-long law enforcement operation, which ended Monday, that targeted men seeking sex with children.

About 16 Florida law enforcement agencies came together to create the ruse that the suspects were chatting online with children or parents offering up their kids for sex.

The men drove down to a pristine home in the city of Oviedo, about 19 miles from Orlando.

Footage released by authorities captured their surprise as their illicit date turned into a rough tackle by a posse of officers.

The black and white footage shows officers slamming the men against the wall of the home before cuffing them. At least one man led police on a brief footchase in the front yard before they took him down.

One of the men, authorities said, was a Florida high school English teacher who arrived at the decoy home with condoms in his pocket planning to have sex with a 14-year-old girl.

Allison Arterberry

About Allison Arterberry

Allison Arterberry is a third year student at the University of Houston Law Center. She graduated from Texas A&M University in 2011 with a B.A. in Political Science and Spanish. She has spent parts of her last two summers interning at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Currently, she is a Senior Articles Editor for the Houston Journal of International Law, the Secretary for the Labor & Employment Law Society as well as a member of the Career Development Student Advisory Board and the Association of Women in Law. Additionally, last year she was the Secretary for Aggie Law Society. Allison is most interested in child victim’s rights in the criminal system.

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