Thursday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Juvenile Angle Frees Man After 14 Years in Jail, The New Indian Express

The Madras High Court has come to the rescue of a 37-year-old man, who has spent 14 years in Vellore prison on the charge of murder by ordering his release on the ground that he was a juvenile at the time of murder.

As Jayavel was a juvenile in conflict with law when the crime had been committed, as per the Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000, he could not have been sentenced to life, a division bench comprising justices K N Basha and P Devadass said.

As per the law, at the most, he could have been detained in a special home for three years. Now, he had been in jail for more than 14 years. Following the mandate of law and Supreme Court decisions, Jayavel should be released from jail, the bench said.

Juvenile Justice Shifts Advances, LEXCH.com

Nebraska lawmakers gave a first-round thumbs-up to changing how the state deals with youngsters who run afoul of the law.

Legislative Bill 561 aims to deal with more of those youths at home rather than putting them in local detention centers or the state institutions at Kearney and Geneva.

“This is a sea change in the way that Nebraska is going to address the needs of juveniles in this state,” said State Sen. Colby Coash of Lincoln.

The bill would shift responsibility for all 3,500 or so juvenile offenders from the Department of Health and Human Services to the state’s Office of Probation Administration.

Center for Children, Law & Policy to Bring National Juvenile Justice Advocates to Houston for Professional Development Training, The Wall Street Journal

Juvenile rights, education and national juvenile defense standards will be the focus of the 12(th) Annual Zealous Advocacy Conference to be held May 16-17 at the University of Houston Law Center. Co-sponsored by the Center for Children, Law & Policy and the Southwest Juvenile Defender Center, the two-day seminar is the premier training for juvenile public defense attorneys practicing in the Southwestern United States.

“This is the only conference in Texas that is specifically designed to help attorneys who defend children in delinquency court,” said Ellen Marrus, co-director of the Center for Children, Law & Policy and the George Butler Research Professor of Law at the UH Law Center. “It gives defenders from various states an opportunity to come together and exchange ideas. We try to make sure our presentations are on the cutting edge.”

Six Houston High Schools Among Top 100 in the U.S., Houston Chronicle

U.S. News & World Report has come out with its 2013 list of best public high schools, and Texas claims 15 spots among the top 100.

No. 1 among more than 21,000 high schools in the nation, according to the magazine, is School for the Talented and Gifted in Dallas.

Two other Dallas schools show up in the top 100 – No. 14, Irma Lerma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School and No. 24, School of Science and Engineering Magnet.

Houston’s first entry on the list is No. 17, with Carnegie Vanguard High School, 1501 Taft St. in Midtown.

In all, Houston has six schools among the top 100.

Allison Arterberry

About Allison Arterberry

Allison Arterberry is a third year student at the University of Houston Law Center. She graduated from Texas A&M University in 2011 with a B.A. in Political Science and Spanish. She has spent parts of her last two summers interning at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Currently, she is a Senior Articles Editor for the Houston Journal of International Law, the Secretary for the Labor & Employment Law Society as well as a member of the Career Development Student Advisory Board and the Association of Women in Law. Additionally, last year she was the Secretary for Aggie Law Society. Allison is most interested in child victim’s rights in the criminal system.

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