Thursday’s Children & the Law News Roundup

Chicago Teachers Suspend Strike, Classes to Resume, CBS/AP

Chicago’s teachers agreed Tuesday to return to the classroom after more than a week on the picket lines, ending a spiteful stalemate with Mayor Rahm Emanuel over teacher evaluations and job security, two issues at the heart of efforts to reform the nation’s public schools.

Union delegates voted overwhelmingly to formally suspend the strike after discussing details of a proposed contract settlement worked out over the weekend.

The walkout, the first in Chicago in 25 years, shut down the nation’s third-largest school district just days after 350,000 students had returned from summer vacation. Tens of thousands of parents were forced to find alternatives for idle children, including many whose neighborhoods have been wracked by gang violence in recent months.

Proposed Juvenile Justice Cuts Vex Local Board, The Capital-Journal

The prospect of the Kansas Juvenile Justice Authority slicing more than $1 million in delinquency prevention programs drew grave concerns Wednesday from members of the Shawnee County Juvenile Corrections Advisory Board.

“That’s sad because it’s so shortsighted,” Dirks told his fellow board members. “The research is pretty clear that efforts in prevention save a lot of money down the road.”

The bulk of the $5.1 million in proposed cuts would come from requiring offenders to “age out” of juvenile custody at 19, rather than allowing them to remain until 23.

Poll: Attitudes Soften Over Children of Illegal Immigrants, USA Today

Findings released Wednesday by the public education advocacy group Phi Delta Kappa International (PDK) show that four in 10 Americans now favor “providing free public education, school lunches and other benefits” to children whose parents are in the USA illegally.

The poll finds that 41% favor such measures, up from 28% in 1995, the only other time PDK asked the question.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.