Thursday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Ohio School Shooter Shows Contempt, No Remorse during Sentencing, CNN

Lane’s own lawyer told the court he urged his client not to make the type of statement that the attorney expected to be delivered.

But no one could have fully foreseen the actions and words of Lane, who entered the courtroom and removed his blue button-down shirt while the judge and those in attendance took their seats.

Lane, now 18, revealed a white T-shirt with the word “killer” written on it.

Test of Anthrax Vaccine in Children gets Tentative OK, Reuters

A presidential ethics panel has opened the door to testing an anthrax vaccine on children as young as infants, bringing an angry response from critics who say the children would be guinea pigs in a study that would never help them and might harm them.

The report, however, released on Tuesday by the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, said researchers would have to overcome numerous hurdles before launching an anthrax-vaccine trial in children. It now goes to Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius, who will decide whether to take the steps the commission recommended.

The one anthrax vaccine approved in the United States, called BioThrax, is made by Emergent BioSolutions Inc of Rockville, Maryland. The company reported $215.9 million in sales of BioThrax, its only licensed product, in 2012.

In a new, updated policy statement, the nation’s largest pediatricians group says that civil marriage for same-sex couples — as well as full adoption and foster care rights for all parents, regardless of sexual orientation — is the best way to ensure legal and financial security for children in these families.

“Children thrive in families that are stable and that provide permanent security, and the way we do that is through marriage,” said Benjamin Siegel, co-author of the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement. The group “believes there should be equal opportunity for every couple to access the economic stability and federal supports provided to married couples to raise children.” Siegel is a pediatrics professor at Boston University School of Medicine.

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