Friday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Court Upholds Search of School Aide’s Desk in Child Sex-Abuse Case, The School Law Blog – Education Week

A police search of an instructional aide’s school desk for evidence of inappropriate communications with an elementary student did not violate the Fourth Amendment, Maryland’s highest court has ruled.

The ruling came in the case of a special education “paraeducator” who was convicted of sexual abuse of a minor and attempted sexual abuse, based entirely on a series of passionate notes and letters the aide had delivered to an 8-year-old girl at the school.

The aide, Karl Marshall Walker Jr., was 38 years old at the time the case unfolded. After a teacher found one inappropriate note in the girl’s possession, the police searched Walker’s desk in a common area of the school. With the school principal’s consent, police searched the desk and removed a box belonging to Walker. They obtained a warrant for that box, which contained notes from the 8-year-old girl to Walker.

 

Juvenile law restorative, not retributive: SC, The Peninsula

New Delhi: The Supreme Court yesterday upheld the Juvenile Justice Act providing for a special reformist approach towards a minor irrespective of the nature of crime committed by him or her, saying that the law aimed to save children in conflict from becoming hardened criminals.

“The essence of the Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000, and the rules framed thereunder in 2007, is restorative and not retributive, providing for rehabilitation and reintegration of children in conflict with law into the mainstream of society,” said an apex court bench of Chief Justice Altamas Kabir and Justice S S Nijjar.

Chief Justice Kabir said: “There are, of course, exceptions where a child in the age group of 16-18 may have developed criminal propensities, which would make it virtually impossible for him/her to be reintegrated into mainstream society, but such examples are not of such proportions as to warrant any change in thinking…”

“…It is probably better to try and reintegrate children with criminal propensities into mainstream society, rather than to allow them to develop into hardened criminals, which does not augur well for the future,” the court said.

Assault Charges for Stepmother After a Girl Falls, NYTimes.com

The stepmother of a 7-year-old girl who was critically injured this month when she fell from a sixth-floor window in Brooklyn has been arrested on assault charges, the police said on Thursday.

On July 10, the woman, Diana Metellus, 19, beat the girl with a belt, then left her unsupervised in a room with no window guards, the police said. Ms. Metellus faces charges including assault with a weapon and acting in a manner injurious toward a child.

The child, who suffered injuries to her lungs, brain and pelvis in the fall, was later found with signs of abuse and traces of cannabis, methadone and amphetamines in her system, the authorities said.

In Tamil Nadu, Nearly 150 Hospitalized After Eating School Lunch, NYTimes.com

NEW DELHI— As many as 147 school girls were hospitalized on Thursday after eating a free lunch at a government school in Tamil Nadu, the local hospital authorities said.

The children from an all-girls high school in Neyveli township in the Cuddalore district complained of dizziness, vomiting and diarrhea soon after they ate a meal of sambar (a spicy lentil broth) and rice, said Dr. Pattu Ravi, a general superintendent at Neyveli General Hospital. He also said that some of those admitted had been given bread for lunch.

The students, ages 12 to 15, received emergency treatment after they were brought into the hospital Thursday afternoon in groups. Describing it as a simple case of “food infection,” Dr. Ravi said none of the patients were in critical condition. After keeping them under observation overnight, the children are likely to be discharged Friday morning, he said.

Dr. Ravi declined to confirm local media reports that identified contaminated eggs as the cause of the illness.

This incident raised alarms as it came a day after more than 20 children in Bihar died from eating a government school lunch believed to have been prepared with cooking oil stored in a pesticide container. One more child died Thursday, bringing the death toll to 23, and nearly two dozen children are still hospitalized.

Tuesday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Juveniles in Indian-controlled Kashmir denied justice, PressTV

In a stark revelation on the grim human rights scenario in Indian-controlled Kashmir, a fact finding report by New Delhi based Asian Centre for Human Rights has termed the situation of juveniles in Kashmir as the worst in India.

The report, which happens to be the first ever documentation on juvenile justice situation in India’s conflict-ridden areas, states that minors in Kashmir continue to be illegally detained under Public Safety Act (PSA) that provides for up to two years of preventive detention.

In absence of juvenile facilities for minor boys and girls, a brazen violation of 1997 J&K Juvenile Justice Act, minors are locked up in prisons with adults.

The report has documented six cases in which the minors have been detained in violation of Juvenile Justice Act and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Criminal justice reference site a worthwhile stop, Wisconsin Law Journal

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service “is a federally funded resource offering justice and drug-related information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide.”

The website includes a wide variety of publications, library abstracts, topical summaries, and a list of related links/websites.

To browse the site’s various topics, the researcher can select the “A-Z topics” link. Choosing an area of interest will produce a list of questions and answers specific to that topic. The webpage will also include links to relevant free and fee based publications. As an added service, the webpage includes a “Find in a library link” providing possible alternative methods for obtaining the article.

The researcher may also choose one of the broader subject-based menu options, including corrections, courts, crime, crime prevention, drugs, justice system, juvenile justice, law enforcement, and victims. From there, the user can conduct a keyword search or review the various subcategories to locate information.

The website contains a wealth of data and general information related to the various areas of criminal justice and is a worthwhile stop when conducting this type of research. If the material is of particular interest, users can also register to receive various newsletters and notifications.