Tag Archives: Miller v. Alabama

Not all children will see the light of day outside of the prison walls

From Erik Eckholm at the New York Times: In decisions widely hailed as milestones, the United States Supreme Court in 2010 and 2012 acted to curtail the use of mandatory life sentences for juveniles, accepting the argument that children, even those who are convicted of murder, are less culpable than adults and usually deserve a […]

The Future of Mandatory Life Sentences for Juveniles

From the Editorial Board at The New York Times: Young people are different. The Supreme Court has delivered that message repeatedly over the last decade in limiting or flatly prohibiting the most severe criminal punishments for those under 18 at the time of their crime. In 2005, the court banned the death penalty for juveniles. […]

Friday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Time to Revisit Juvenile Sentencing Practices, Daily Press One year ago, in the case of Miller v. Alabama, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that mandatory sentences of life without the possibility of parole may not be imposed upon children, even in cases involving a homicide. The court had earlier ruled in Graham v. Florida that […]

Tuesday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Common Core is Putting Teachers Back in the Curricular Driver’s Seat, Eduwonk There’s been a lot of hullaballoo suddenly about the Common Core. Symptomatic of the strange political times we live in, the Tea Party Right and the social justice Left have found common ground on the purported dangers of Common Core standardization. What both […]

Tuesday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Is 100 Years a Life Sentence? Opinions are Divided, New York Times If people who are too young to vote commit crimes short of murder, the Supreme Court said in 2010, they should not be sentenced to die in prison. That sounds straightforward enough. But there are two ways to understand the decision, Graham v. Florida. One […]

Saturday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

High Court Says State Improperly Requested Medical Records in Truancy Case, Omaha.com Lisa Siefker has spent two years fighting to get her teenage autistic son to attend school regularly after he violated Nebraska’s controversial truancy law. But the 41-year-old Lincoln woman’s willingness to cooperate reached a limit when state officials overseeing the case wanted to […]

Tuesday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Clayton juvenile program becomes model for state reform, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Quantavius Poole was a school brawler, a drug dealer, and he was facing five years in juvenile detention. Now, at 17, he is a sous chef for a caterer. He hopes to enlist in the National Guard so he can pay his way through […]

Wednesday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Wyoming Juvenile Killer Law Not Retroactive, Casper Star Tribune A new Wyoming law that ends mandatory life imprisonment for juvenile killers won’t change the sentences of eight people already serving life for crimes they committed before the age of 18. The law, which Gov. Matt Mead signed two weeks ago, gives juveniles with life sentences […]

Friday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Texas high court to consider whether SCOTUS’ Miller ruling on juvie LWOP is retroactive, Grits for Breakfast The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals this week agreed to hear arguments in Ex Parte Terrell to determine whether the Supreme Court’s Miller v. Alabama – a case which banned life without parole (LWOP) sentences for juveniles if lesser options weren’t offered – […]

A Summary of U.S. Supreme Court 2011-12 Term Decisions Affecting Children & Education

Education Week’s “High Court Highlights” of the 2011-12 term, provides a nice recap of the Supreme Court’s high-profile cases that have left implications on public education, juvenile justice, and more. IMMIGRATION: Arizona v. United States Court upheld a measure requiring police to determine the immigration status of someone they stop, and reasonably suspect to be […]

More Analysis on Today’s Alabama v. Miller Decision

Ellen Marrus is the George Butler Research Professor of Law at the University of Houston Law Center. Professor Marrus also serves as Director of UH’s Center for Children, Law & Policy and Director of the Southwest Juvenile Defender Center. She received her J.D. in 1990 from the University of San Francisco and her LL.M. from Georgetown […]

Mandatory Life Without Parole for Juveniles Found Unconstitutional

Today, Justice Kagan’s opinion for the Supreme Court in Miller v. Alabama and Jackson v. Hobbs (Arkansas) was announced.  The Court held that the Eighth Amendment prohibits mandatory sentencing of life in prison without parole for juveniles.  This is a great step in understanding that children are different and less mature than adults and deserve […]