N.J. Law Grants Sick Children Access to Edible Medical Marijuana

Medical Marijuana

As reported by CNN, New Jersey passed into law on Tuesday a measure allowing sick children access to edible medical marijuana.

Qualifying minors in New Jersey will now have a wider variety of treatment options, and the new law will remove the limit on the number of marijuana strains that may be cultivated.

The new law also requires parental permission for edible marijuana to be made available to minors through tablets, capsules, drops or syrups, according to New Jersey Assembly Democrats who advanced the legislation.

[Governor] Christie, a Republican, vetoed the original bill in August and said he would sign legislation that included a rule that edible marijuana would be dispensed only to minors and that a psychiatrist and a physician both would have to approve before a minor could join the program.

The final version of the bill includes both of Christie’s demands, according to a news release from the state’s Assembly Democrats.

The passing of this bill is a heartening multi-party response to what has typically been (in my opinion, somewhat unreasonably) a divisive topic.  The winner here is ill children and their parents who have more comprehensive health options for disease treatment.  One example of such is laid out in the article.

The bill was originally proposed after Brian and Meghan Wilson of Union City began a campaign to get what could be life-saving treatment for their 2-year-old daughter, Vivian. She has Dravet syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy for which anti-seizure medicine is ineffective, according to Democrats’ statement this week.

Hopefully this children first policy can be a template for political parties to find inroads to compromise that shy away from antiquated rhetoric and place our families’ best interests at the forefront.

Brandon Schrecengost

About Brandon Schrecengost

Brandon Schrecengost is a second year student at the University of Houston Law Center. He graduated with his Bachelors degree in Anthropology from the University of Houston in 2007. After graduation, Brandon taught science and music at Sharpstown Middle School in Houston ISD. He began working as an intern with the Center for children Law and Policy this summer and is currently the treasurer of the International Law Society at UHLC. Brandon’s interest in how legal policy effects children the world over, particularly in the realm of education, continues to inform his work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.