Monday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

The Bully Effect, Anderson Cooper 360

An extraordinary documentary called “Bully” captured a behavior adults hear about, but rarely see: the way some kids pressure and relentlessly harass their peers. Filmmaker Lee Hirsch was embedded in several schools for an entire year. What he filmed was so raw and eye-opening that the project catapulted a movement, sounding the alarm about the critical and dangerous issue of bullying.

Something profound has also happened as a result. In the time since “Bully” was released, a number of kids and parents profiled in the documentary, and the filmmaker himself, have been on life-changing journeys, and in some instances have experienced remarkable transformations.

AC360° has dedicated the past year to tracing the course of their journeys and personal missions. In partnership with Cartoon Network, AC360° wants to share their stories with you in a powerful documentary called “The Bully Effect,” premiering on CNN on February 28 at 10 p.m. ET.

Adoption, Wales Online

Children in Wales are spending almost five years in care before being placed with adoptive parents, statistics released to WalesOnline show.

In Ceredigion children on average spent four years and nine months in care, which is more than twice as long as the Welsh average stay of two years and three months.

In 2011 researchers at the University of Bristol concluded instability in care “often leads to a downward spiral” of “poor educational results, unemployment and a lifetime of poverty”.

Georgia Lawmakers Take Up Ethics, Juvenile Justice, The Augusta Chronicle

Two major pieces of legislation come to the House floor this week, ethics and juvenile-justice reforms…The juvenile law rewrite has been in the works for years, and agreement has finally been reached by advocates on all sides. It would change where most troubled children are held, from state custody to county supervision.

Lisa Steffek

About Lisa Steffek

Lisa Steffek is a third year student at the University of Houston Law Center. Lisa completed her Bachelors, Masters and Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Texas in Human Development and Family Sciences. As an undergraduate, Lisa worked as a research assistant studying child attachment. Lisa also worked for several years at The Settlement Home, a residential treatment center for emotionally disturbed adolescent females. Most of the girls at The Settlement Home had been removed from their homes by Child Protective Services, and Lisa worked with the girls to teach them life-skills and provided psychological treatment to prepare them for adulthood and the transition to foster homes. Lisa also worked for six years in various academic capacities at the University of Texas, including an undergraduate teaching assistant, graduate research assistant, and undergraduate writing consultant. Lisa has presented papers regarding human development at various academic conferences in the states and abroad, and has had her writing published in an international, academic journal.

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