Category Archives: Juvenile Law

Weekly Roundup

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is linked to delayed brain development, The Washington Post For the first time, scientists can point to substantial empirical evidence that people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder have brain structures that differ from those of people without ADHD. The common disorder, they conclude, should be considered a problem of delayed brain maturation and not, as it […]

Weekly Roundup

Minority juvenile offenders face inequities in mental health treatment, The Dallas Morning News Every day, our jails and prisons take in large numbers of offenders who have serious mental health issues. But how good are we in diagnosing and treating their illnesses? Traditionally, not very good, and the record gets worse with respect to providing […]

A Promise to Our Children

President Barack Obama issued a Presidential Proclamation for National Youth Justice Awareness Month on Friday. The statement recognizes several areas within our criminal justice system that are in need of reform with respect to children suspects. Simultaneously, it avows the government’s commitment to our youth. President Obama stated: The essential promise that we make to […]

Weekly Roundup

Nine Groups Call for Gov. Abbott to Appoint Task Force to Address School Policing, RGVProud Citing recent police use of force on students in Texas schools by school resource officers, [on May 17th] nine advocacy organizations called on Governor Greg Abbott to establish a task force to examine school policing issues in preparation for the […]

Weekly Roundup

Photo Exhibit, film, speaker to address juvenile justice issues, Eric Jome, Illinois State University, March 1, 2016. A photo exhibition focused on juvenile detention centers, the screening of a documentary on the lives of troubled young women, and a presentation on a prison art program will draw attention to issues surrounding the American juvenile justice […]

Zero Tolerance Policies: Courts Turn a Blind Eye

Students do not enjoy a Constitutional right to a free education. Nonetheless, in Goss v. Lopez, the Supreme Court held that students are entitled to the Fourteenth Amendment’s due process protections when they are suspended or expelled from school. The Fourteenth Amendment includes both procedural due process and substantive due process. The first requires specific […]

Children and the Law News Roundup

            A good week for juvenile justice! In Miller v. Alabama; the Supreme Court held that sentencing life without parole to juveniles was a cruel and unusual punishment. The issue was whether this 2012 decision should apply only to future cases or did it also include  past cases. In Montgomery v. Louisiana, the […]

Houston School Board Refuses To Ban Suspensions

Despite the fact that school boards across the country have banned school suspensions, Texas has yet to join the growing trend. Five Houston ISD school board members voted to keep school suspensions as a last resort for teachers who are “deal(ing) with kids who they can’t contain” in pre-kindergarten through second grade classrooms. The rejected plan also included […]