Kansas Legislation Aimed At Allowing Parents To Spank Harder Rejected

In Kansas currently spanking is allowed but it crosses the line and become child abuse when it leaves a mark. Kansas is one of a handful of states where corporal punishment is legal in schools. Democratic state representative, Gail Finney, aimed to expand that definition of corporal punishment by making it legal to spank and leave a mark for parents, teachers and other caregivers.

Finney says she proposed the law to “restore discipline to families” and protect parent’s rights.
The proposed law would legalize up to ten spankings by hand per child. The law would also allow parents to delegate others to spank their children and included no age limit on children who can be spanked.

Opponents say that one spank is too many and find Finney’s allocation of 10 strikes as completely arbitrary. Critics also allege that the bill attempts to legalize child abuse. Child abuse experts report that spanking is an outdated form of punishment and is less effective than time-outs.

Finney denied these accusations saying the bill was not intended to legalize child abuse but to establish consistent parental corporal punishment standards across Kansas. Britt Colle, the McPherson Deputy County Attorney who inspired Finney to draft the bill remarked, “This bill clarifies what parents can and cannot do. By defining what is legal, it also defines what is not.”

The bill was quickly rejected but has generated much debate on spanking, particularly in schools.

Belgian Lawmakers Grant Children the Right to Die

http://green-mom.com/topics/child-and-baby/international-adoption-at-all-time-low.html#.UlwDHRB4jmg

The lower house of the Belgian Parliament have adopted a bill that extends the right to euthanasia to minors. Belgium was already one of the very few countries where euthanasia is legal, but until now it has only been applicable for adults.

Belgium legalized euthanasia in 2002 for those in “constant and unbearable physical or mental suffering that cannot be alleviated.” Until now, minors had to wait for nature to take its course or for them to turn 18.

Parliament voted 86 to 44 to amend the euthanasia law so that it would apply to minors, but only under certain additional conditions. Circumstances include parental consent and the requirement that the minor exhibit a “capacity for discernment” as determined by a psychiatrist or a psychologist.

Before the legislation can go into effect, King Philippe must agree with and sign it.

There is widespread support in Belgium for the bill in the largely liberal country. However, it has also sparked vehement dissent from some. Dissenters argue that the legislation is too harsh and final, and an abandonment of children. Conversely, supporters of the legislation argue that children should have a choice and parents should not be forced to watch their terminally ill children suffer as they approach their inevitable death.

With adoption of the bill, Belgium will join the Netherlands in allowing euthanasia for children. The Netherlands has allowed child euthanasia since 2002 with parental consent. Since its adoption, only five children have utilized the Netherlands’ law.

“Avonte’s Law”: GPS Tracking System For Children With Autism

In October of 2013, New York teen Avonte Oquendo, disappeared from his school and was confirmed dead last month. Avonte was afflicted with autism and seen in security cameras fleeing the school on the day he went missing. Now, New York Democratic Senator Charles Schumer has proposed a bill that would provide optional tracking devices for children with autism. The legislation is known as “Avonte’s Law” and would designate $10 million in federal funding for the program. The focus of the program would be aimed at locating missing children with autism more quickly.
Subsequent to his disappearance, volunteers spent months searching for Avonte. Sadly, his remains were found last month along the banks of the East River.

The program is modeled after a similar program for people who suffer from Alzheimer’s. “We know how to do it, we’ve seen it done – it works,” says Senator Schumer. Under the new program, police would track kids.
“The only barrier is the funding,” says Senator Schumer, “the devices themselves cost about 80 or 90 dollars, and then it costs only a few dollars a month to do the monitoring.” The devices would be designed to be worn anywhere: belts, wristwatches, shoelaces.

Representatives of Autism Speaks hope the bill will become law. However, the autism awareness group also wants more far-reaching legislation on a federal level that would include funding to teach practical skills like swimming. Autistic children have a higher rate of drowning, encouraged by their noted inclination for water. While Avonte’s case remains under investigation, the authorities have not ruled out drowning being that he was found near a river.