Author Archives: Alex Hunt

Alex Hunt

About Alex Hunt

Alex Hunt is a former Yale & Irene Rosenberg Graduate Fellow at the Center for Children, Law & Policy. Alex graduated from the University of Texas in 2008 with a Bachelor of Arts in government. Before entering law school, he taught middle school math at YES Prep Southwest in Houston with Teach For America. In 2010, he received New Leaders' EPIC Spotlight Teacher Award, a national award for teachers with outstanding student growth. Alex graduated cum laude from the University of Houston Law Center in May 2013. During law school, Alex was Casenotes & Comments Editor for the Houston Journal of International Law, interned for both state and federal judges, and served as Vice President of the Health Law Organization (HLO). In addition, Alex has received the Irving J. Weiner Memorial Scholarship Award (for a year of outstanding work in the UH Law Center Legal Clinic), the Napoleon Beazley Defender Award (for outstanding work on behalf of children), the Ann Dinsmore Forman Memorial Child Advocacy Award, the Mont P. Hoyt Memorial Writing Award for an Outstanding Comment on a Topic in International Law, and he was a finalist for Texas Access to Justice's Law Student Pro Bono Award. Alex is currently in private family law practice with the Hunt Law Firm, P.L.L.C. in Katy, Texas.

Tuesday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Here’s a look at today’s top stories affecting children’s rights, juvenile justice, and education: Visa offers path for immigrant youth in state care, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Maria Boudet has no memory of Mexico or how she came to the United States. What she does remember is the year she turned 16 and found out she was […]

Monday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Here’s a look at today’s top stories affecting children’s rights, juvenile justice, and education: Expelling Zero Tolerance: Reforming Texas School Discipline for Good, Texas Public Policy Foundation Grits for Breakfast reports on the Texas Public Policy Foundation’s new report that shows Texas zero tolerance policies needlessly cost taxpayers money while having little effect on student […]

Welcoming the Center for Children, Law & Policy’s Newest Scholars & Interns

The Center for Children, Law & Policy at the University of Houston Law Center is proud to welcome this year’s Irene Merker Rosenberg Child Advocacy Scholars. The new Scholars come from a wide range of backgrounds and will continue to advance the Center’s mission. Ashley Pierce is a second year student at the University of […]

Sunday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Here’s a look at today’s top stories affecting children’s rights, juvenile justice, and education: Texas Districts Flagged for Suspending Students With Disabilities, Education Week Disability Rights Texas has flagged 30 districts for disproportionately using out-of-school suspensions to punish students with disabilities. Based on data from the Texas Education Agency, the group said that in these […]

Saturday’s Children and the Law News Roundup

Here’s a look at today’s top stories affecting children’s rights, juvenile justice, and education: Cultural Considerations Rejected in N.Y. Private Placements, Education Week New York Governor Andrew Cuomo vetoed a bill Tuesday that would have required school districts to consider cultural factors when deciding on private placements for students with disabilities. In a statement cited by the New York […]

Texas Juvenile Justice Department Appoints New Director

The Texas Juvenile Justice Department (TJJD) has hired a new executive director: Michael Griffiths, the highly regarded retired director of Dallas County’s juvenile justice program, was hired this afternoon as the new executive director of the Texas Juvenile Justice Department. The vote was 7-6. Griffiths, who served on the governor’s State Juvenile Justice Task Force […]

What is a Parent’s Role When Their Child is Being Interrogated?

University of North Carolina Professor Tamar Birckhead wrote an interesting blog post addressing the role of parents during juvenile interrogations: The question of the proper impact and role of the parent arises most often in the context of the interrogation of juveniles.  A few states (including Colorado, Connecticut, and North Carolina) require a parent or guardian to […]

N.J. Governor Chris Christie Signs Teacher Tenure Reform Law

Governor Chris Christie (R-NJ) signed a bill Monday making it more difficult for teachers to receive tenure. The bill, though hotly debated in New Jersey’s legislature, was a rare example of bipartisanship: Gov. Chris Christie today signed a contentious bill aimed at toughening the path to tenure for the state’s public school teachers, hailing it as […]

Weekly News Round-up: August 6, 2012

“Reasonable suspicion” vs. probable cause in schools. A Washington Supreme Court decision overturned a school resource officer’s inspection of a student’s backpack. Although school administrators only need a “reasonable suspicion” to search students, school resource officers are law enforcement officials who still need probable cause to conduct a search. The “reasonable suspicion” standard for school […]

GAO: Charter Schools Enroll Less Students with Special Needs

The Government Accountability Office released a new report, at the request of Congressman George Miller (D-CA), that found that charter schools around the country enroll less students with special needs than traditional public schools. GAO researchers focused on three questions: How do enrollment levels of students with disabilities in charter schools and traditional public schools […]

Recent Developments in Education Law: June 20, 2012

Romney Releases Education Plan. A few weeks ago, presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney announced his education plan. The plan contains few surprises. Romney’s plan hits teacher’s unions and calls for private school vouchers. Although Romney’s school voucher plan is not unexpected, a writer at Time Online called Romney’s proposal “puny.” One of Romney’s policy […]

Juvenile Detention Education: 3 Success Stories

This post is part of this month’s “What’s Going Right in Public Education” series, highlighting achievements and forward-thinking ideas happening now in education policy, law, and practice. “In America, education is still the great equalizer.” Secretary of Education Arne Duncan Americans hold a nearly universal belief that education can be a “great equalizer.” Despite the problems with […]