Are Texas Juvenile Correctional Facilities Improving?

The Austin-American Statesman reported last week on a survey of Texas youth offenders that shows that more juveniles are feeling safer in state-run facilities. The report also shows that additional reforms must be implemented.

A survey of more than 100 youths at a Central Texas juvenile correctional facility demonstrates the need for more reforms in the state juvenile justice system and for policies that keep youths closer to their homes, advocates say.

The state’s juvenile system is in the throes of sweeping reforms. In 2007, lawmakers passed a series of laws that reformed how the Texas Youth Commission kept juvenile offenders safe after stunning revelations of sexual abuse by the adults charged with caring for them.

Though the vast majority of youths surveyed reported feeling safe in the juvenile justice system and hopeful about their futures, they identified attacks from their peers as among their biggest concerns, and they said more staff training was the No. 1 thing they would change about the system. They cited negative interactions with staff, including perceived mistreatment and unfair rule enforcement, and said guards seemed ill-prepared to deal with youth assaults and bullying, according to the survey released this week by the Texas Criminal Justice Coalition.

The Texas Legislature passed a number of measures in 2007 after a sex abuse scandal rocked the Texas Youth Commission. Based on survey results, the Texas Criminal Justice Coalition outlined a number of next steps to continue reforms. Some suggestions included more training for staff members that interact with youth, implementing additional reforms that reduce youth-on-youth violence, and establishing policies that keep juveniles closer to their homes and families.

The Statesman article also quoted Jim Hurley, a spokesman for the Texas Juvenile Justice Department, who characterized the study as a “good report.”

Texas State Senator John Whitmire, Chair of the Senate Criminal Justice Committee, will be speaking at the 11th Annual Zealous Advocacy Conference at the University of Houston Law Center this Friday and Saturday. Senator Whitmire has played a key role in the restructuring of the juvenile criminal justice system in the aftermath of the TYC sex abuse scandal. He will be speaking Friday afternoon in a session about TYC Restructuring.

Alex Hunt

About Alex Hunt

Alex Hunt is a former Yale & Irene Rosenberg Graduate Fellow at the Center for Children, Law & Policy. Alex graduated from the University of Texas in 2008 with a Bachelor of Arts in government. Before entering law school, he taught middle school math at YES Prep Southwest in Houston with Teach For America. In 2010, he received New Leaders' EPIC Spotlight Teacher Award, a national award for teachers with outstanding student growth. Alex graduated cum laude from the University of Houston Law Center in May 2013. During law school, Alex was Casenotes & Comments Editor for the Houston Journal of International Law, interned for both state and federal judges, and served as Vice President of the Health Law Organization (HLO). In addition, Alex has received the Irving J. Weiner Memorial Scholarship Award (for a year of outstanding work in the UH Law Center Legal Clinic), the Napoleon Beazley Defender Award (for outstanding work on behalf of children), the Ann Dinsmore Forman Memorial Child Advocacy Award, the Mont P. Hoyt Memorial Writing Award for an Outstanding Comment on a Topic in International Law, and he was a finalist for Texas Access to Justice's Law Student Pro Bono Award. Alex is currently in private family law practice with the Hunt Law Firm, P.L.L.C. in Katy, Texas.

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